The London Art Fair

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Now in its 28th year, the London Art Fair is once again attracting buyers and collectors, creatives and artists like bees to a honey pot. Housed this year in Islington’s Business Design Centre from January 20th-24th, the fair is a three floored exhibition of everything from fine art to sculpture, with all pieces available to buy. If you happen to have a spare few hundred thousand pounds you may be able to come away with a few originals for the living room wall – after all, when a painting is only half the price of a one bed flat in the city, it’s a bargain, right?

Wandering around the fair last Wednesday evening, glass of Prosecco in hand, I felt pretty sophisticated .The great thing about the London Art Fair, even for an admittedly ‘not-so-au-fait-with-art’ kind of person, is the huge variety of artists and work on display – there really is something for everyone. Original Warhols stood alongside quirky crocheted works; Barbara Hepworth pieces were displayed opposite the witty work of Grayson Perry.  Multimedia pieces were the flavour of the moment; a particular favourite was of a woman whose hair had been replaced by a multi-coloured collage-effect of people, flowers and even buildings.

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Some of the pieces I was ever –so- properly- artistically-analysing admittedly made me think ‘I could have done that’: there was also, though, a great deal there that I under no circumstance could have even contemplated creating. One sculpture that stood out was created using perfume bottles imitating the classic Chanel No 5; replacing the brand name, however, were words that revealed the darker side of the beauty industry. Instead of Chanel, the bottles read ‘depression’, ‘solitude’, ‘help’ and ‘melancolie’ (sic).  – this is what I’d call perceptive and thought-provoking modern art, and there was a lot on offer in this vein.

chanel.jpgEssentially, the London Art Fair is a mini-showcase from a lot of galleries; some of which have obvious niches and specialisms, and others that seem to take the ‘I’ll have a bit of everything’ approach – a buffet collector if you will. If money was no object, I’m pretty sure I’d take that approach: on a single lap around the fair I could pick out at least 5 works of art I wouldn’t mind having, all different, all completely clashing, but each one particularly appealing for some unknown reason. That is the beauty of the London Art Fair: despite these paintings being on sale, you are under no obligation to part with a penny once there. It’s like being inside a very big if a little pretentious art shop without the awkwardness. So if you want to be overwhelmed by a completely huge, at times incredible, at times confusing, exhibition of art, this is the place for you. It’s not around for long, though, so be sure to check out the London Art Fair before Jan. 24th.

 

 

NB: Alongside those paintings that I could have done myself were a couple that I could have done myself WHEN I WAS FIVE.

 

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3 thoughts on “The London Art Fair

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